Cyberattacks and data breaches: best practices for protecting your SMB

Cyber attacks and data breaches prevention tips best practices

Small businesses or SMBs are the lifeblood of any economy and Canada is no different. If you’re a small business owner thinking that you’re too insignificant for cybercriminals, you’re wrong. Experts believe that cybercriminals typically need very little resources for mass-producing attacks. SMBs tend to be more vulnerable to cyberattacks and data breaches since they generally spend less on cybersecurity.

This article explores the best practices you should consider adopting to protect your business from cyberattacks and data breaches. 

6 Best practices for preventing data breaches in your small business

Here are six of the simplest ways you can prevent data breaches in your business.

Improve user awareness

The first step towards protecting your business against cyberattacks and data breaches is improving user awareness about the cybersecurity landscape. With over a third of cyberattacks and data breaches involving internal threat actors, this cannot be overemphasized. Experts believe that improving user awareness within your organization can overall establish your employees as a human firewall.

By improving cybersecurity awareness within your business, you’d be ensuring that your employees understand the threats likely to affect them. They’d also be able to understand how to keep themselves protected or stay away from activities that are likely to prevent a breach. 

For instance, understanding how to spot phishing attempts or tackle business email compromise from vendors would be a great start. Improved awareness will also help your employees understand the need for strong passwords and the use of multi-factor authentication. You should also consider setting up Privileged Access Management to understand and manage all the user accounts within your enterprise.

Update all systems promptly

Leaving your systems and applications running with outdated firmware or software essentially make your business vulnerable to cyberattacks and data breaches. Remaining protected will involve you taking steps like regularly installing security updates, upgrading to newer software or discarding obsolete systems. By installing updates promptly, you’d be patching up any known vulnerabilities and preventing zero-day exploits by hackers.

A quick look into the WannaCry ransomware of 2017 shows that the majority of victims could have easily avoided the cyberattack by either updating their operating system or abandoning an obsolete version of Windows.

Backup your data frequently

However hard you prepare, there’s always the chance that something may go wrong. From hardware failure to ransomware attacks, backing up your data can help you ensure that you never have to start from scratch after an incident. However, you should aim to create backups the right way. Creating backups without validating them may give you a false sense of security if you’re unable to retrieve them.

Check out our detailed backup recommendations for small businesses here.

Use Intrusion Detection and Prevention (IDS/IPS) systems

Intrusion detection/prevention systems are an essential cybersecurity component for small businesses in the digital age. They generally listen to your network for bad traffic or potential attacks and prevent your systems from communicating with bad threat actors. If you’re looking to take your small business cybersecurity a notch higher, this is one practice you should adopt.

From preventing malware attacks across your network to stopping trojans and even phishing, IDS/IPS generally stop malicious activity against your business by dropping or resetting connections.

Furthermore, you should consider setting up firewalls with IDS/IPS rather than ISP-provided routers. Home-grade routers are built to allow users to connect easily and do not generally offer any firewall protection or monitoring. However, a firewall with built-in IDS/IPS can monitor your traffic to prevent malicious activity.

Consider getting cyber insurance

If you’re wondering why we’re talking about insurance as a way of protecting your business from data breaches, don’t fret. Cyber insurance can be a vital tool in your SMB’s cybersecurity arsenal. With 60% of businesses (mostly SMBs) closing within six months of a data breach, cyber insurance can be the difference between going bust or surviving in the unfortunate event of an attack.

Cyber insurance aims to protect businesses from the consequences of cyberattacks and data breaches. Some of these consequences can include fines, compensation and loss of business. As the cyber threat landscape continues to evolve, you’ll need to understand the benefits of cyber insurance as well as its limitations for your business and industry.

Boost your vendor and endpoint security

As you probably already know, no business can operate in this digital age without relying on support from third parties or vendors. Third parties like cloud service or application providers are typically granted privileged access to your IT infrastructure to enable them to support you seamlessly. 

However, this constantly increases the risk of a cyberattack or data breach of your business. The danger here is that if there’s a cyber attack on any of these vendors, the hackers may be able to access your systems using the privileged access already granted.

Similarly, the rise of BYOD policies and culture across Canada ultimately means that your small business now has to deal with more data endpoints than ever. Without adequate endpoint security and management, you may be leaving your business vulnerable to data breaches and cyberattacks. The average cost of an endpoint cyberattack in 2019 was $9 million and zero-day attacks show no signs of slowing.

Why MSPs and MSSPs are essential for preventing and recovering from data breaches in the digital age

The costs associated with getting numerous disparate cybersecurity tools is usually a discouraging factor for Canadian SMBs. MSSPs essentially overcome this problem by offering specialized services that meet the very needs of small businesses. They also provide solutions capable of overcoming the typical challenges that businesses face today. Overall, MSSPs can help your small business by reducing and managing their cyber risks as well as offering recovery support in the event of a cyberattack or data breach.

The bottom line

With SMBs making up 98% of all businesses in Canada, it’s fair to say that they will continue to be attractive targets for cybercriminals. The relatively limited budgets SMBs allocate for cybersecurity also means that they may be falling short. However, hiring MSPs and MSSPs can help bypass this challenge. 

Contact us today to discover how our small business cybersecurity solutions can help you with preventing, detecting or responding to cyberattacks and data breaches.

6 Simple Tips to Protect Your Customer Data

6 Simple Tips to Protect Your Customer Data

As cyber-attacks continue to make headlines, hackers are exposing or selling customer data files in record numbers. But just like with any threat, there are actions you can take to minimize risk and ensure your business retains a positive reputation among customers. 

1. Stop using the same password on repeat.

Set a mandate for all staff that passwords must be unique for each user and for your workplace. That means it can’t be remotely like the one on their home PC, tablet or online banking. Passwords are hacked more than ever, so when you’re prompted for a password change, dig deep and really think about what goes into a hacker-proof password. If remembering them is a problem, consider one of the latest password management tools.

2. Go on a shredding spree.

How much sensitive data is being dumped into the recycling bin? Valuable customer data is often taken from the bins of small businesses and quickly sold or published. It’s not just good practice to shred sensitive documents, it’s the law.  Take 5 seconds to run documents through the shredder or book in the services of a secure shredding company.

3. Ditch the accounting spreadsheets.

Still using an Excel doc for all your number-crunching? Besides making your accountant’s job harder (and more expensive), you’re opening your business to a massive range of vulnerabilities. Even with password-protection, spreadsheets aren’t designed to safeguard your financials or those of your clients. Upgrade to a proper accounting solution with built-in customer data protections and security guarantees.

4. Train staff explicitly.

You can’t rely on common sense because what you think is a given might be news to someone else. It can be extremely beneficial to hold special data-safety training sessions once or twice a year as a reminder, as well as take the time to induct new staff into the way things are done.

5. Limit access to data.

Just like the bank manager who guards the keys to the vault, you can limit who accesses your data. Revoke employee access as soon as they leave your business for good, and set rules around who can access what – and when. Do they need access to sensitive information while working from home? Should they be able to change the files, or only view them?

6. Keep your software updated.

Possibly the most preventable hack, having outdated software can be an open invitation for cyber-criminals. They look for known weaknesses in business software and waltz right in. While the nagging pop-ups and reminders to update can feel like a selling ploy, they’re actually helping your business to stay in the safe zone. Updated software gives you protection against new viruses and hacking techniques, plus closes off those nasty weaknesses.

If you would like to make sure your business is secure from data breaches, give us a call.

Does Dropbox Make Sense For Your Business?

Does Dropbox Make Sense For Your Business?

It seems so easy! Drag your files into a Dropbox folder and you’ve got yourself a file sharing system that brings your business in line with modern expectations. But then again, maybe not.

Dropbox has grown to become one of the main file sharing and cloud storage solutions of choice, with a core simplicity that’s hard to deny. But for business, that simplicity comes with a catch.  In some cases, sticking with the familiar blue box can provide good value, and of course, it never hurts when your staff already know how to use your software. In other cases, you’ll need to consider alternatives designed to meet your needs more explicitly.

When Dropbox is a Good Choice

Micro-sized: If your business is small with no more than a handful of employees (or none);

No sensitive information: This includes accounts, customer details, vendor, staff or proprietary data; plus

Nobody ever accidentally deletes anything: Dropbox is a syncing service, which means when a file is deleted, it deletes it from all machines. While the file is recoverable from the Dropbox website within 30 days, by the time you notice it’s missing, it might be too late.

If you’re thinking those attributes sound more like a fictional business, you’re not far off.    Somehow, Dropbox’s popularity in the consumer sphere has snuck into business environments, despite the risks.  Key amongst these is the fact that Dropbox is designed for syncing, NOT backup. This means while your data is sprawling across all connected devices, it’s a mirror of the source only – when you delete or change the original file, the Dropbox version immediately syncs with it.  In some cases, this can spread malware between your connected devices and put all of them at risk.

Your business also misses out on important security controls, such as user-level access control and password protected links. Rather like a free-for-all, the shared files are sitting there available to anyone with either a connected device or an unsecure weblink. You’ll also miss collaborative editing, losing out in productivity and data resilience as multiple employees overwrite each other simultaneously, with no record of who even opened the file, let alone changed it.

If Dropbox makes sense for your business, there’s no reason to change. But if it’s clearly not a good choice for you, there are multiple corporate grade syncing solutions. These are designed for business with security, encryption and collaboration controls built in. Rather than the easiest solution which may pose a risk to your business and digital security, consider implementing a scalable solution that meets all your needs.

Call us to discuss syncing solutions for your business

Facebook is for Sharing, Not Storing

Facebook is for Sharing, Not Storing

When was the last time you held an actual photo album or actual prints of photographs in your hands? Maybe you look back at older photographs only when Facebook’s TimeHop app reminds you of a pic from five years ago. If so, you may be risking your visual history.

Facebook is a great way to share photos with friends and family around the world. You get to enjoy their comments and the affirmation of their likes. But using Facebook as storage for your photos is not a good plan. Here’s why.

Some people treat Facebook as their photo album archive. They delete the originals from their devices or digital camera when they need more space. But Facebook compresses images for faster download. It satisfies impatient social media users, which means photo quality suffers. If you wanted to print those photos in the future, they wouldn’t look as good as the originals.

That’s not the only drawback. When you trust Facebook with all your photos, you’re letting a company control your visual archive. It’s hard to imagine, given Facebook’s reach today, but what happens to your photos if the company goes defunct? We don’t know. The people who were keeping their photos on Myspace in 2006 might have an idea.

The younger crowd is already moving onto other social platforms. Plus, Facebook’s growth rate in North America and Europe is slowing. Those daily active users are the primary source of revenue. So, you know Mark Zuckerberg is in some meetings about that.

Even if Facebook continues as the business behemoth it is today, we don’t know what policy changes it might make. It could change its terms of service whenever it wanted (if you even read those in the first place). Users have no guarantee for how long Facebook will store their images or any type of content.

Keep in mind also that many of the photos showing up in your timeline are actually taken by friends. Facebook provides an entire album of other people’s photos when they’ve tagged you, but if they decided to untag you or remove it, that photo would be gone.

Finally, there’s also the risk of your account getting shut down or hacked. You’ve probably had friends warn you not to accept any new friend requests from them because they’ve been compromised. You wouldn’t want a thief to steal all your photo albums. Similarly, you don’t want a cybercriminal to gain access to all your images.

Our Recommendation

Just as with data, we recommend you have a “3-2-1” backup system for your digital photographs. This means having three copies of the photos you care about. You don’t need to back up the blurry ones if you don’t want to.

You might keep one copy on the original device, but you’d have two other copies of the high-quality, uncompressed, original image as well. One might be kept on an external storage device such as a USB thumb drive, and the other you could upload to cloud storage.

The cloud backup gives you access to the photos from any device in any location. So, if a flood, hurricane, or fire devastates your home, and you lose your device and the USB thumb drive, you still have a backup. Your Facebook photos and videos are just there to be shared with friends and family.

Not sure where or how to safely store your photos and videos? We can help! Our experts may even become new Facebook friends. Then we can all like each other’s photos with the peace of mind that the original photos aren’t going anywhere.

To Backup or To Archive? ’Tis The Question

To Backup or To Archive? ’Tis The Question

Hamlet worried about whether to be or not. You may be more preoccupied with whether backup or archiving is better for your business. You know you need to secure your data, but how? This article examines the different benefits of both options.

Back in the day, businesses kept important information on paper. They stored important records and notes in nearby filing cabinets for easy access.

When there were too many files to close the cabinet drawers any longer, someone would do a big clean out. Older, important documents would get boxed for the basement or other storage area. They might still be needed for tax, or compliance, or other reasons. But you didn’t need those files readily accessible any longer.

A similar scenario is true of digital business data. You can back it up to recover from hardware failure, cyberattack, or disaster event. Or you might archive the data for space management and long-term retrieval.

Deciding Between Backup and Archive

When it comes to the right form of data storage you’ll need to weigh:

  • the period of time you need to keep the data;
  • what protections from loss or illicit access your method offers;
  • whether the data can be easily restored or retrieved;
  • how accessible, searchable, and quickly available the data will be;
  • any industry or compliance standards that need to be met.

The backup is a copy of your data. On a regular basis you’ll make a copy of the business data to provide you with a starting point in the event of a disaster. You’ll decide how often to backup based on how often the data changes and the importance of data currency.

Backing up data, an operating system, or application files, doesn’t delete the originals. However, your older backup may be deleted when you make the new copy. If not, the backup can have another use. It can allow users to go back and review or recover earlier versions.

It’s not a bad idea to have several backups. We recommend the “3-2-1” backup strategy. You’ll have three copies of your business data. One would be on the cloud, the other two on different devices (e.g. on your local computer and on a backup drive).

Archiving puts a copy of business data into long-term storage. This is the data equivalent of moving that box of files to the basement. Typically, the archived version becomes the only available copy of that data.

The archives’ permanent record of data may prove useful in future legal disputes. Archived data is often tagged to enable streamlined search down the road. Moving information to archive can also improve processing speed and storage capacity.

While a backup may be overwritten, archived data is generally not altered or deleted. In fact, it’s often physically disconnected from the computer or network. So, you’ll turn to a backup to restore your data if necessary, and to archives to retrieve information data.

Key Takeaway

Both backup and archive can prove useful. It’s not going to happen every day, but entire digital archives can be lost if a server is drowned by a flash flood. All the paper backups can be burnt to cinders in an electrical fire. That external hard drive could be stolen or crushed by falling debris in a hurricane.

It’s best to avoid having a single point of failure. Both backing up and archiving business data is a smart precaution. Ensure business continuity by preparing for the worst. Our computer experts can help you backup, archive, or both. Start securing your business data with our support today!

Cloud Storage or Local Server – The Best of Both

Cloud Storage or Local Server – The Best of Both

Cloud computing is the biggest buzzword in business today, and for good reason too. The cloud provides many a new-found freedom to do and achieve more than ever before. Greater collaboration, unlocking work possibilities in new locations and often reducing costs provides a healthy boost for many companies.

Every business is unique however, and cloud solutions don’t fit for every scenario. Connection issues, internet plans, or technical requirements can rule it out as an option in some instances. In these situations, we might install a Network Attached Storage (NAS) solution instead. Which is a very small server with lots of hard drives.

A NAS is particularly popular in small, mid-sized businesses, and even home environments. Due to their low power consumption, small footprint, and low cost, they often represent an ideal upgrade. Power users and businesses can enhance their networks and get more out of their systems by employing a NAS device to do the heavy lifting.

Reliable, Fast Access

When a property can’t achieve lightning fast internet speeds or services aren’t reliable enough to run a business on; a NAS solution is ideal for the job — serving files locally rather than from a remote server can save vast amounts on uploads and downloads.

Many of the benefits of the cloud can be created locally inside your home or office. Network storage allows you to save and retrieve files from multiple devices with fast local network speeds. Rather than being limited by the speeds offered by your ISP; you can complete file transfers, backups, and sharing at the speed of the hardware you purchase yourself.

A NAS gives you many advantages of the cloud with the level of control, speed, and accessibility of a local server. All this is achieved for a fraction of the cost and maintenance overhead typically associated with conventional servers.

One Device, Many Uses

NAS devices can act as a centralized backup location for active files and devices across the network. Using the device as a file store allows you to share projects easily, collaborate on files, and keep up-to-date copies while revisions change.

The device can be set up to allow redundancy across multiple hard drives. This means backed up data is never vulnerable to only a single hardware failure.

A fully redundant NAS is capable of handling a hard drive failure, or even removal, without interrupting your workflow. Simply replacing the affected hard drive with a new one will backup your files again and rebalance your device as if nothing had happened at all.

Lightweight File Access

Even retaining access to your files away from the office isn’t an ability exclusive to cloud services. NAS devices can be configured to provide secure access to files and folders on remote connections. Working remotely, using a NAS solution, can be done just as easily as if you were sat in the office.

Even when the rest of the office IT is shut-off and shut down, a NAS device can remain on and connected to the network, so access is never interrupted. 

A NAS device can run 24/7 without issue. Their low power consumption makes it practical to leave the device powered on for regular backups and easy data access. Devices don’t require the heavy maintenance or large footprint of a bulky server. As a simple solution, a NAS device allows you to focus only on the data.

The Best of Both Worlds

A NAS provides high-speed file access and configuration of a local server and combines it with the low footprint and ease of use of a cloud service. Without relying on a bad ISP, weak connection, or power-hungry hardware, a NAS could be the solution that supercharges your business.

Find out if network storage is the right fit for your business. Call us today to talk about the IT you need to meet your goals.

A New Year’s Data Resolution to Stick To

A New Year’s Data Resolution To Stick To

Many of us set goals, tasks, and challenges to tackle in the new year.  Cleaning out the spare room, shopping around for the best energy deals, or exercising more than we did last year.   We set these goals to improve our lives and build on productivity, health, and organization in the future.

Resolutions to improve for the coming year are great ideas to aspire towards; whether organizing your office, tidying your house, or taking control of your digital footprint.  The problem for many is motivation can quickly fall away by the time February rolls around. If you manage to achieve only one of your new year goals for this year, make it to put a good backup in place for your digital files.

Storage failure, theft, accident, or natural disaster can impact at any time.  Many of us put these possibilities to the back of our minds.  We plan to organize our files ‘eventually’ and then never get around to it.  It’s easy to think ‘it won’t happen to me’ or make creating a backup something that is always to be done tomorrow.

Replacing Old Valuables

Almost anything you own can be replaced one way or another.   A broken laptop, tablet, or phone can easily be replaced with another model.  Even credit card or financial details, if stolen or lost, can be cancelled and replaced by the bank in under a week.

Losing data, however, is far tougher to face.  Without a safe backup, there’s no way to recover it once it is gone.  Backups provide a service which could be described as the world’s best insurance policy.

While an insurer will often give you some, even most, of the value of the previous goods lost; data backup provides you with your exact data, precisely how you left it.  It does this instantly, repeatedly, and without any additional charges or excess.  In some instances, it is even automatic and done behind the scenes.

Recovering Irreplaceable Data

There are almost certainly old essays, browser bookmarks, and notes that you can comfortably live without.  Equally, there are likely to be photographs, videos, and important documents that you couldn’t or should not part with.

For many, these files can be as valuable as the memories themselves: photographs of loved ones, long ago vacations, or milestone events in life. We commonly take critical data for granted; Assuming that because we can access it today, it will still be there tomorrow.  This is unfortunately not always true.

These irreplaceable files are too important to keep in just a single place.  Retaining only a single copy leaves your data vulnerable to luck and chance as to how long and if it survives.

Losing Data In An Instant

Data storage is liable to develop faults or failures at any time.  Often a storage failure isn’t made apparent until the device fails to turn on or dies suddenly.  These types of hardware failure become more and more likely as devices age.

Similarly, modern devices are more and more vulnerable to loss or theft as they get smaller and lighter.  While criminals are not likely to be interested in your irreplaceable photographs and documents, they are vulnerable to being stolen along with the device they plan to sell. Whether lost through natural disaster such as flood or fire, misplaced by accident, or stolen by criminals; important files are truly painful to lose.

If you were to lose these files in an instant today, how much would you pay to end that stress and get them back again?  Setting up a good backup is only a tiny fraction of the cost without any of the pain.

Backup For You

With the right backup solution, it doesn’t matter how many devices are lost or stolen.  Even without a device or away from home, the data important to you can be kept safe and sound to be returned to you when you’re ready again.

Regular, consistent backups can even be made for you, automatic and in the background.  Documents you create, photographs and video you take can be backed up and kept safe from the second they are captured or saved.

If you have travelled too long on borrowed luck, without putting a backup in place, give us a call to get set up with a robust and dependable backup solution for your data.

How To Make Your Photos Last A Lifetime (and Beyond)

How to Make Your Photos Last A Lifetime (and Beyond)

Digital cameras are great, and thanks to smartphones, we have one with us almost all the time. We’re taking more photos than ever before, and building a lifetime of digital data. But despite the enormous value of these photos and videos, most people don’t have a backup. It’s time to shine a light on this essential task and make it a regular habit before those precious memories are gone forever.

If you asked someone what possession they’d save from a house fire, most would say photos, and they’d make a point of grabbing a frame or album on the way out. But with digital photos, you don’t need a fire to lose everything, they could simply disappear in the blink of an eye with hardware failure or theft. There’s no warning, no smoke alarm, and without a plan already in place, no chance to recover the data. It’s time to get set up with a true backup system.

Is one copy enough?

You might think saving your information to an external hard drive or flash drive is enough. You’re right, it’s better than nothing, but since the data is stored in only one place, this isn’t a backup – it’s just storage. That drive could fail at any moment, perhaps from age, malfunction or plain old theft.

Often enough, that drive even becomes lost over the years, put somewhere ‘safe’ and promptly forgotten! And with the way technology is moving, accessing that data in 5 years might even bring up compatibility issues – some newer computers don’t even have CD/DVD drives, yet hundreds of thousands of homes would still have photos stored on a disc.

Two copies?

You might have your extra storage drive as backup and keep a copy on your computer. This is a better solution, and how most people store their data, but it still isn’t enough. While you’re protected against device failure, that house fire is going to take both copies up in flames. Thieves would probably grab the external drive while they’re bundling up your computer too, so again, you’d be left with zero copies. It’s close, but it’s not a true backup system.

The rule of three

We subscribe to the backup rule of three. Just reading this may sound like overkill, but tech is fragile and device failure is a constant risk. We recommend keeping one copy on the computer/device, another on an external drive, and a third copy as last resort tucked safely away in the cloud. The cloud backup can be fully automated so you don’t even need to worry about remembering to do it. If the day comes that you need your data back, it’s ready and waiting in perfect condition. Cloud technology also means your data is far away from any potential fire or flood, it’s secure and with the right provider, guaranteed against loss.

There’s a saying in the IT industry: “There are two kinds of people: those who backup, and those who have never lost all their data”. No matter what the cause of your data loss, it always has a deep impact, particularly when it comes to precious data. While re-creating some homework or the family budget might just be inconvenient, there’s no way to recreate photos once they’re gone. It’s a loss that hurts for a long time, but it’s also so very avoidable.

If you value your data, give us a call to implement a well-rounded backup system.

What is the Best Way to Backup?

What is the Best Way to Backup?

“That will never happen to me.” We get through our lives telling ourselves the worst won’t happen to us. It’s the same with business: “We won’t need this data backup.” Yet, whatever your industry, secure, reliable backup ensures business as usual. So, what’s the best way to backup? Here’s help.

Why You Need to Backup

  • Business disruptions of any kind can be costly. The disaster might take one of several shapes:
  • Natural (e.g. wildfires, floods, earthquakes, or hurricanes)
  • On-site (e.g. hardware/software failure, power outage, inability to access building)
  • Employee driven (e.g. damaging mistakes or intentional sabotage by a disgruntled employee)
  • Cyber-attack (e.g. data breach, ransomware, or distributed denial of service attack).  

Regardless, the best backup solution can help reduce downtime and damage. 

Plan B: Approaches to Backup

There are several off-the-shelf backup options your business can use. Let’s consider the pros and cons of the most popular ones.  

USB Thumb Drives — Also known as “flash drives,” “pen drives,” or “memory sticks,” these thumb-sized devices are compact and portable. But, they have size limitations compared to hard drives. Also, the mobility makes them easy to lose (which can actually set the disaster scenario in motion).  

Additionally, a USB thumb drive is robust when not plugged in, but more vulnerable when attached. If someone inadvertently snaps the drive or employs too much force, they can put the data on that backup at risk.

The cheap ones also tend to be slow, which can make backing up sluggish. 

USB Hard Drives — Portable hard drives increase the data storage available, often at a decent price. They are designed to be compact and mobile. You can prioritize durability, processing speed, storage volumes and more. 

Hard drives are less likely to get damaged than a thumb drive. If knocked or jostled, the cables are flexible. Still, a hard drive can be prone to physical failure. Selecting an external solid slate drive (SSD) can help since it has no moving parts. Information is stored instead in microchips. 

Cloud Storage — Backing up to the cloud stores data on an external, secure server. If thieves take your computers and USB backup, you can still access your data on the cloud. Cloud storage providers build in redundancy to ensure your backup remains safe.  

Most cloud storage services back up to secure centers with thousands of servers storing data. Oh, and they’ll have their own server backups too, just in case they’re the ones hit by a disaster. The providers also encrypt data during transit to further ensure compliance and security. 

Migrating to a third-party cloud storage service also cuts the clutter at your premises. You can count on expert help to ensure security and compliance. Plus, you can cut operational costs by offloading in-house storage or external hard drive expenses. 

OK, What’s the Best Answer? 

Don’t think disaster won’t strike your business. Research has found data loss and downtime are most often caused by:

  • Hardware failures (45% of total unplanned downtime)
  • Loss of power (35%)
  • Software failure (34%)
  • Data corruption (24%)
  • External security breaches (23%)
  • Accidental user error (20%). 

We recommend the 3-2-1 backup strategy. This means having 3 copies of your data. Two (2) of these would be located on different devices (e.g. on your computer and on a backup drive). The other remaining backup copy (1) would be secured offsite, in the cloud.

Want to secure your data for the worst? Give us a call to set this up.